Mountains of Western North Carolina

Emotional Support Addendum

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT
Section I of FHEO Notice: FHEO-2013-01, Issued April 25, 2013

Section I: Reasonable Accommodations for Assistance Animals under the FHAct and Section 504

The FHAct and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) implementing regulations prohibit discrimination because of disability and apply regardless of the presence of Federal financial assistance. Section 504 and HUD's Section 504 regulations apply a similar prohibition on disability discrimination to all recipients of financial assistance from HUD. The reasonable accommodation provisions of both laws must be considered in situations where persons with disabilities use (or seek to use) assistance animals in housing where the provider forbids residents from having pets or otherwise imposes restrictions or conditions relating to pets and other animals.

An assistance animal is not a pet. It is an animal that works, provides assistance, or performs tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability, or provides emotional support that alleviates one or more identified symptoms or effects of a person's disability. Assistance animals perform many disability-related functions, including but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to sounds, providing protection or rescue assistance, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, alerting persons to impending seizures, or providing emotional support to persons with disabilities who have a disability-related need for such support. For purposes of reasonable accommodation requests, neither the FHAct nor Section 504 requires an assistance animal to be individually trained or certified. While dogs are the most common type of assistance animal, other animals can also be assistance animals.

Housing providers are to evaluate a request for a reasonable accommodation to possess an assistance animal in a dwelling using the general principles applicable to all reasonable accommodation requests. After receiving such a request, the housing provider must consider the following:
(1) Does the person seeking to use and live with the animal have a disability - i.e., a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities?

(2) Does the person making the request have a disability-related need for an assistance animal? In other words, does the animal work, provide assistance, perform tasks or services for the benefit of a person with a disability, or provide emotional support that alleviates one or more of the identified symptoms or effects of a person's existing disability?

If the answer to question (1) or (2) is "no," then the FHAct and Section 504 do not require a modification to a provider's "no pets" policy, and the reasonable accommodation request may be denied.

Where the answers to questions (1) and (2) are " yes," the FHAct and Section 504 require the housing provider to modify or provide an exception to a "no pets" rule or policy to permit a person with a disability to live with and use an assistance animal(s) in all areas of the premises where persons are normally allowed to go, unless doing so would impose an undue financial and administrative burden or would fundamentally alter the nature of the housing provider's services. The request may also be denied if: (1) the specific assistance animal in question poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others that cannot be reduced or eliminated by another reasonable accommodation, or (2) the specific assistance animal in question would cause substantial physical damage to the property of others that cannot be reduced or eliminated by another reasonable accommodation. Breed, size, and weight limitations may not be applied to an assistance animal. A determination that an assistance animal poses a direct threat of harm to others or would cause substantial physical damage to the property of others must be based on an individualized assessment that relies on objective evidence about the specific animal's actual conduct - not on mere speculation or fear about the types of harm or damage an animal may cause and not on evidence about harm or damage that other animals have caused. Conditions and restrictions that housing providers apply to pets may not be applied to assistance animals. For example, while housing providers may require applicants or res ident s to pay a pet deposit, they may not require applicants and residents to pay a deposit for an assistance animal.

A housing provider may not deny a reasonable accommodation request because he or she is uncertain whether or not the person seeking the accommodation bas a disability or a disability¬ related need for an assistance animal. Housing providers may ask individuals who have disabilities that are not readily apparent or known to the provider to submit reliable documentation of a disability and their disability-related need for an assistance animal. If the disability is readily apparent or known but the disability-related need for the assistance animal is not, the housing provider may ask the individual to provide documentation of the disability ¬related need for an assistance animal. For example, the housing provider may ask persons who are seeking a reasonable accommodation for an assistance animal that provides emotional support to provide documentation from a physician, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional that the animal provides emotional support that alleviates one or more of the identified symptoms or effects of an existing disability. Such documentation is sufficient if it establishes that an individual has a disability and that the animal in question will provide some type of disability-related assistance or emotional support.

However, a housing provider may not ask a tenant or applicant to provide documentation showing the disability or disability-related need for an assistance animal if the disability or disability-related need is readily apparent or already known to the provider. For example, persons who are blind or have low vision may not be asked to provide documentation of their disability or their disability-related need for a guide dog. A housing provider also may not ask an applicant or tenant to provide access to medical records or medical providers or provide detailed or extensive information or documentation of a person's physical or mental impairments. Like all reasonable accommodation requests, the determination of whether a person has a disability-related need for an assistance animal involves an individualized assessment. A request for a reasonable accommodation may not be unreasonably denied, or conditioned on payment of a fee or deposit or other terms and conditions applied to applicants or residents with pets, and a response may not be unreasonably delayed. Persons with disabilities who believe a request for a reasonable accommodation has been improperly denied may file a complaint with HUD.

HMR Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support) Eligibility Addendum

Housing providers (Landlord) are to evaluate a request for a reasonable accommodation to possess an assistance animal in a dwelling using the general principles applicable to all reasonable accommodation requests as per the FHAct and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) the U.S. DEPARTMENT 01" HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; Section I of FHEO Notice: FHEO-2013-01, Issued April 25, 2013 (copy of said Notice Section 1 (copy provided on reverse side for informational purposes)) regarding Reasonable Accommodation for Assistance Animals ( includes for Emotional Support) under the FHAct and Section 504.

After receiving such a request and to help in determining your eligibility for an “Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support)”, the Landlord needs to consider your answers to the following questions.
Do you, the person and seeking to use and live with the animal, have a disability - i.e., a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities?(Required)
Do you, the person making the request, have a disability-related need for an assistance animal? In other words, does the animal work, provide assistance, perform tasks or services for the benefit of a person with a disability, or provide emotional support that alleviates one or more of the identified symptoms or effects of a person's existing disability?(Required)
If the answer to question (1) or (2) is "No," then the FHAct and Section 504 do not require a modification to a provider's " no pets" policy, and the reasonable accommodation request may be denied.

Where the answers to questions (1) and (2) are "Yes," the FHAct and Section 504 require the housing provider (Landlord) to modify or provide an exception to a "no pets" rule or policy to permit a person with a disability to live with and use an assistance animal(s) in all areas of the premises where persons are normally allowed to go, unless a reason for denial is applicable. The request for an Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support) can be denied for any of the reasons cited as reasons for a denial in the said HUD Notice.

If you answered yes to both questions above, then you, the person (Tenant) requesting an Assistance Animals (for Emotional Support), will need to provide proper documentation unless the disabilities are readily apparent or known to the Landlord. See example for emotional support assistance animal below.

For Example: the Landlord may ask persons (Tenant) who are seeking a reasonable accommodation for an assistance animal that provides emotional support to provide reliable documentation of a disability and their disability-related need for said assistance animal from a physician, psychiatrist, social worker, or other mental health professional that the animal provides emotional support that alleviates one or more of the identified symptoms or effects of an existing disability. Such documentation is sufficient if it establishes that an individual has a disability and that the animal in question will provide some type of disability-related assistance or emotional support.

Requesting Tenant Information:

Mental Health Professionals Information:

Date Emotional Support Animal Documentation Issued(Required)
Documentation must be updated every 12 months and re-approved.

Animal Information:

Has the Animal ever been aggressive toward people or other animals?(Required)

The following information must b uploaded as a PDF or JPG:

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        Office Use Only

        Tenant meets the criteria cited above for said Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support).and is approved by Landlord as qualifying to have said Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support) in Tenants dwelling unit at the location and address stated herein.
        Landlord:___________________________________________
        Owner(s) by:___________________________________________
        dba HOLTON MOUNTAIN RENTALS (HOLTON MANAGEMENT, Inc.), Agent for the owner(s)
        Tenant does not meet the criteria cited above for said Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support).and Tenant is declined as being eligible to have an “Assistance Animal (for Emotional Support) in its dwelling unit at the address shown above for the following reason(s) _____ Answered Question 1 and/or 2 above no. _____ Did not provide the necessary documentation.
        Other Reason(s):_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
        Landlord:___________________________________________
        Owner(s) by:___________________________________________
        dba HOLTON MOUNTAIN RENTALS (HOLTON MANAGEMENT, Inc.), Agent for the owner(s)

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